Using linphone



  • @ogogon Ubuntu Touch uses a rather unique App framework so none of the existing mobile Apps is suppsoed tun there. Its not a matter of taste if we make a new binary, its rather a must.

    So we took the core libraries of Linphone but put them into new clothes, and connected all the parts as UT demands it to do. We cannot reuse easily any of those designs, so its rather a rewrite than a port of the official App 😉



  • @CiberSheep said in Using linphone:

    see I don't express very well here.

    You have nothing to apologize for. Rather, I need to do this.
    English is not my native language, I am not its native speaker.
    Therefore, in many situations I understand the lexical meaning, but I do not understand the intonation. Because mechanisms for transmissions of intonation are taken from a little familiar to me the cultural layer.
    Please do not worry - in such situations I always ask again.

    • Why a dialer?
    • What's the benefits to have another assembly specific to the phone number that will be useless for SIP uris?
    • What's the downside of having the OS keyboard

    Objectively, you are completely right.
    But this is very habitually: if you run the softphone, the dialer immediately runs in.

    The easiest is to install Logviwer that reads in /var/log/ check that the log doesn't show any SIP number

    I installed this program, switched it to the /var/log directory, however I didn’t find a file like linphone.log there.
    Do I need to enable logging somehow? Or do I need to look in some other file?

    Ogogon.



  • @ogogon Sorry to correct @CiberSheep but application logs are not in /var/log but in the user´s app area, and logviewer App can read from there. Do not use to capture logs with terminal or cmdline, open the log viewer app and look there.



  • @Flohack said in Using linphone:

    @ogogon Ubuntu Touch uses a rather unique App framework so none of the existing mobile Apps is suppsoed tun there. Its not a matter of taste if we make a new binary, its rather a must.

    So we took the core libraries of Linphone but put them into new clothes, and connected all the parts as UT demands it to do. We cannot reuse easily any of those designs, so its rather a rewrite than a port of the official App 😉

    Aha! Now I finally understood what was happening! What everyone means, but never speak directly.
    The ingenious developers of UT have created an nothing incompatible platform and you cannot just compile an already developed package on it. The package needs to be rewritten for it.
    We have another android, only open source!

    (I'll go drink three hundred drops of essential valerian!)



  • @Flohack said in Using linphone:

    @ogogon Sorry to correct @CiberSheep but application logs are not in /var/log but in the user´s app area, and logviewer App can read from there.

    I'm sorry, I already reconfigured it to /var/log. What is the path to user applications area?

    Do not use to capture logs with terminal or cmdline, open the log viewer app and look there.

    And if I go over ssh and say 'tail -f filename', can something go wrong?
    (Of course, I do not want to doubt the reasonability of your advice, but I have done this all my life and it worked.)

    Ogogon.



  • @ogogon said in Using linphone:

    I'm sorry, I already reconfigured it to /var/log. What is the path to user applications area?

    Pardon the intrusion. Fresh installation of logviever operates in /home/phablet/.cache/upstart. Have a nice day.



  • @jezek said in Using linphone:

    Pardon the intrusion. Fresh installation of logviever operates in /home/phablet/.cache/upstart. Have a nice day.

    Thank you!



  • @Flohack said in Using linphone:

    @ogogon Sorry to correct @CiberSheep but application logs are not in /var/log but in the user´s app area, and logviewer App can read from there.

    In the area of user applications, I found two files - linpfone-tmp.log and linphone.cibersheep.log. Apparently, both are empty - if you click on them, an empty window opens.
    I made calls before - both successful and unsuccessful.

    Am I doing something wrong again?

    Ogogon.



  • @ogogon said in Using linphone:

    @Flohack said in Using linphone:

    @ogogon Sorry to correct @CiberSheep but application logs are not in /var/log but in the user´s app area, and logviewer App can read from there.

    I'm sorry, I already reconfigured it to /var/log. What is the path to user applications area?

    Do not use to capture logs with terminal or cmdline, open the log viewer app and look there.

    And if I go over ssh and say 'tail -f filename', can something go wrong?

    Ooops... sorry about that.

    You need to have the app open to see the log



  • @ogogon you are not supposed to use /var/log as a shared directory. Apps are confined in what they can do quite heavily (as on every mobile device OS so far), and have their own directory for logs and temporary stuff. This is done for security. How else could we ever allow 3rd parties (means non-Ubuntu Touch developers) to contribute any App through a store?

    If you trust all the world its fine, we don't. So, Apps cannot do what they want and should not do what they want. Also, the whole root file system is read-only. Also do not use apt to update stuff. We got image-based OTA upgrades. It is faster, saves write cycles on the flash storage, and its transactional, meaning no partially upgraded systems . This is not a desktop, saying this just once more.

    The advantage is a superior stability, you cannot brick your device easily, Apps cannot spy on each other and the system, most rootkits/hacks wont work on UT etc. You have claims that Apps can request and the user can allow or disallow them, like mic, camera etc access. This is not possible in a traditional desktop OS. So, a big win.

    If you tamper with that security model, you are on your own. We cannot support you when you start changing the way how the OS works. If you start rearranging how logging works you need to give Apps elevated permissions, and that's not how we think a mobile OS should work these days.

    So before you complain about why we made everything wrong you should better ask why decisions were made in that way. We di dnot make our life more complicated because it´s fun but because we wanted to improve the architecture.


Log in to reply