How to flash Nexus 5



  • Hello,

    My Nexus 5 currently runs Ubuntu Touch, but I would like to install /e/ OS on it to test. The instructions to do so are found at https://gitlab.e.foundation/e/wiki/en/wikis/device/hammerhead/install. Is there anything special I need to do in UT to prepare to install TWRP or flash the /e/ ROM?

    Thank you.



  • No, you don't need to do anything special to prepare.

    A side note: /e/ is horrible. A better choice is microG for LineageOS, which /e/ is based on a ripoff of.



  • @B2288 said in How to flash Nexus 5:

    No, you don't need to do anything special to prepare.

    A side note: /e/ is horrible. A better choice is microG for LineageOS, which /e/ is based on a ripoff of.

    Much of the info on that page is out of date, some of it applies to LineageOS too (e.g., Google fallback DNS), and in general is written in the tone of a hit piece. E has had some attribution issues in their code, true, and it seems this page was set up solely in reaction to that, but they have never claimed not to be based on LineageOS + microG, and the rest of it is just poorly slung muck. Notably, the E online service integration is what differentiates E from other Android distros, so at least the claim should be that E is nothing more than LineageOS + microG + NextCloud + Postfix + Dovecot + integration that no one else has ever bothered to do to make it easy on the end user.

    I'm not advocating using E. My Android phones run CalyxOS (which has microG) and LineageOS + microG. But to say that E is nothing more than LineageOS + microG and brings nothing new to the table is inaccurate.



  • Thanks everyone. If I test /e/, then I'll know more, good or bad.

    Regards



  • @trainailleur Thanks for clarifying that. I guess I should do more research before spreading FUD.☺



  • @B2288 said in How to flash Nexus 5:

    @trainailleur Thanks for clarifying that. I guess I should do more research before spreading FUD.☺

    No worries. 🙂 I'm not a particular advocate of them, and it's true they have been sloppy with attribution in their sources, but it's an interesting project that seems to have some momentum and perhaps a chance to make alternative Android distros a little more mainstream. Anyone can set up Nextcloud/Owncloud etc. and do the same, but it's a lot of work, and a lot of the populace would never get around to it, so I find the project goals kind of interesting.


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